So as you might have noticed in the comments to the last post, Mez saw that annoying/¸ber-cool link-preview thing and made a poem with it. I love the speed of this easy technology and of people like Mez who just snap it up and run with it!

As you can see, the code-snippet only shows previews to linked pages on other domains. So Mez created a quick-and-easy blog dis[ap]posable, put up a few technically very simple HTML pages on another server, and linked to them from her poem. Ta-da: instantly a new genre is born.

Similar effects have been used, so I suppose it’s not exactly a new genre. But there’s something about taking disposable, ready-made, super-easy bits and pieces and putting them together as Mez has done that’s just really fascinating. Yes, you can do that. Very simply. And by putting the link preview thing to a purpose other than its intended purpose (as Duchamp did with his pissoir) Mez has me seeing it all anew.

What fun. What next?

4 thoughts on “snap preview as readymade (ready-to-assemble) poem

  1. Ron Wilson

    This is a really nice effect.

  2. jill/txt »

    […] ][mez][: …da next: http://disapposable.blogspot.c om/2007/01/dollrganic-time-bur n.html ta jill:) […]

  3. Unsnapped » CogDogBlog

    […] Though is this interesting concept, a blog full of poems by [[mez]] (what language??) that uses links to some external preset sites to add some visual oomph to words, as jill noted: As you can see, the code-snippet only shows previews to linked pages on other domains. So Mez created a quick-and-easy blog dis[ap]posable, put up a few technically very simple HTML pages on another server, and linked to them from her poem. Ta-da: instantly a new genre is born. […]

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