I just sent Espen (my wonderful supervisor) my last thesis chapter, the one about hoaxes and stuff. I think it’s sort of OK but after having chopped out the ridiculous attempts at Lacan (not really my cup of tea, though I struggle with deep feelings of inadequacy for not always know when to spell “other” with a capital O) I’m worried it’s all just chatty surface stuff with no depth. So to distract myself, since I was on a deadline and needed to procrastinate, I started marking words so Word will generate an index. Wow. I am so impressed. Not only do I have interactivity, definition and narrator, homodiegetic, I have twelve mentions of Online Caroline, three of Kaycee Nicole and several different uses of ontological. I wonder whether putting the index at the front of the thesis will impress the committee enough to pass it?

I’ve promised Espen to have the conclusion done by Tuesday night. Then I’ve just got to polish it all and make sure it’s sort of all about the same thing. I’m so excited going to sleep doesn’t seem an option at all!

3 thoughts on “impressive indexing

  1. Jason

    At last! Someone who admits Lacan isn’t their cup of tea. When I attended a presentation on Lacan on my campus, it seemed that everyone there was trying to feign understanding of this concept of the Other (other?) and the Real (real?). [when to capitalize is a problem in itself]

    I was only able to bond with one other person who shared my sentiments: What the Hell (capital H) is Lacan talking about? lol.

  2. Jill

    🙂

  3. jon

    good to hear it. I’m just getting to the final final stages of my own PhD in Imaginative Writing so I can share your feelings. Having written a couple of novels I know what it’s like to write a monster work but a PhD beats everything. it’s just such darn hard work.

Leave A Comment

Recommended Posts

Machine Vision

Cultural Representations of Machine Vision: An Experimental Mixed Methods Workshop

Call for submissions to a workshop, Bergen, Norway
Workshop dates: 15-17 August 2022
Proposals due: 15 June

The Machine Vision in Everyday Life project invites proposals for an interdisciplinary workshop using qualitative approaches and digital methods to analyse how machine vision is represented in art, science fiction, games, social media and other forms of cultural and aesthetic expression.