Cute, isn’t it?

Locations of visitors to this page
Where are visitors to this page?
(Auto-update daily since 27-Jan-04)

I find myself wondering who’s in which city – Bergen and Oslo are easy, and Copenhagen and Helsinki, and I think I can place Philadelphia, New York and Boston and one of those Californian places, there are some people in the Netherlands, somone in Kuala Lumpur, I think, and what’s that city in South America? There are readers in Melbourne, Sydney and Canberra – and Alice Springs! I just adore the idea of someone sitting in Alice, reading this!

Apart from California and South America, I’ve been to each of these places. That may not be a coincidence.

Do you like the map, or is it too intrusive? Too big brotherish? I mean, we still don’t know who you are. Just where.

17 thoughts on “where are you?

  1. hanna

    But it shows that you have no visitors from the UK! And I know that’s wrong! (She says, currently in the UK.)

  2. MarkH

    yes, and also the sunny, exotic city of Coventry!! That smells of fried food today for some reason.

  3. Liz Lawley

    Can you spot the Rochester cluster? 🙂

  4. Jill

    Oh nice 🙂

    I think maybe it’s only updated once a day. At midnight. I installed it yesterday evening, and it was showing “starting tomorrow” or something – so perhaps this is just whoever visited yesterday after I installed it, and nobody from England read my weblog between the hours of 8 pm or whenever and midnight?

    Now I can’t wait till tomorrow to see what happens to it 🙂

  5. Scott

    I think it’s cool. I never assume I’m completely anonymous when I visit blogs anyways, I’m sure I’m not the only one who checks my referrers and visitor stats compulsively.

    (I’m the Vancouver dot, by the way 🙂

  6. LiL

    I like it. I can usually pretty much tell where people are from looking at access logs and at who provided the connection for the visit (i.e. broadband providers or phone companies – they’re often quite location-specific). Not always, just usually.

  7. Jason

    I think the lowest big dot of the 3 on the east coast in N. American is likely Washington D.C.?

  8. McChris

    I’m in Austin, Texas, but I don’t see it on the map. 😛

  9. Johanka

    I’ll be the dot in central Europe – Brno, Czech Republic.

  10. Wilson

    That city in South America seems to be Montevideo (Uruguay).

  11. Jill

    Cool hearing who’s where! It doesn’t seem to have updated overnight, though. Hm. I’ll leave it a while longer and see whether it ddoes anything m ore.

  12. William Wend

    I check my referral logs every night. This is really cool. I like the nice cluster by New Jersey

  13. Francois Lachance

    Map is askew. Something odd in the shape of the map.
    I could spot Rochester, NY and the Canadian cities of Hamilton and Kingston situated at either end of Lake Ontario. No Toront. But ahah there is a second Lake Ontario. And Toronto is there in a universe by itself. Forlorn. But hey… that’s not a second lake. It’s Lake Eire. eerie, eh?

  14. Lars

    Interestingly inaccurate. Just like in RL, Norway ends at Trondheim.

  15. Stewart

    and sadly no memory of West Australian visits? 🙁

  16. Jill

    Well, the map updated, but I guess it’s not entirely accurate…

  17. H?•kon Styri

    I suspect that proxy servers may have some influence on the map. In addition, some ISPs that cover several countries may reassign IP numbers faster than the geographical positions are updated.

    My own small test also indicates that the number of visitors seems to be smaller than what my own traffic log reports.

Leave A Comment

Recommended Posts

Machine Vision

Cultural Representations of Machine Vision: An Experimental Mixed Methods Workshop

Call for submissions to a workshop, Bergen, Norway
Workshop dates: 15-17 August 2022
Proposals due: 15 June

The Machine Vision in Everyday Life project invites proposals for an interdisciplinary workshop using qualitative approaches and digital methods to analyse how machine vision is represented in art, science fiction, games, social media and other forms of cultural and aesthetic expression.

Digital Humanities Machine Vision

What do different machine vision technologies do in fiction and art?

For the Machine Vision in Everyday Life project we’ve analysed how machine vision technologies are portrayed and used in 500 works of fiction and art, including 77 digital games, 190 digital artworks and 233 movies, novels and other narratives. You can browse […]

AI and algorithmic culture Presentations

My talk on caring AIs in recent sci-fi novels

I’m giving a talk at an actual f2f academic conference today, Critical Borders, Radical Re(visions) of AI, in Cambridge. I was particularly excited to see this conference because it’s organised by the people who edited AI Narratives A History of Imaginative Thinking […]