I’m not sure how useful this visualisation of my LinkedIn network is. They say I can use it to figure out which areas of my professional network I need to work on. But it’s pretty. And fairly accurate at grouping people. The blue people are all electronic literature or Digital Arts and Culture conference people. The brown ones are mostly other US academics in game studies, digital culture and social media. The pink ones are Digital Culture alumni and the eggplant colored ones at the bottom are all at media at the University of Oslo. The light blue people at the bottom and the green people at the top are all Norwegians who apparently are in two separate groups that never mix.

Tomorrow I’m teaching networks, and I was looking for a video animation of how scale-free networks emerge, based on Barabási and others’ work – the readings for tomorrow are Barabási’s introduction to A Networked Self, where he explains random networks, scale-free networks and power laws, and Granovetter on weak and strong ties. Unfortunately, this is the closest I got to that video animation. I’d better figure out how to explain it on my own!

2 thoughts on “visualising my LinkedIn network

  1. […] the commentariat is largely invisible in the LinkedIn world (except for Jill Walker Rettberg, who sicced me onto LinkedIn Maps). Also, a number of personal friends are not here, simply because LinkedIn is a professional […]

  2. Espen

    Jill,
    I posted my network here http://appliedabstractions.com/2012/01/17/what-you-can-learn-from-your-linkedin-network/

    Thanks for the tip!

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