A link-filled post from Kristine Lowe (descriptively titled Will we see state-controlled intranets start replacing the Internet in 2012?) led me to Douglass Rushkoff’s argument that we need to create a genuinely peer-to-peer internet to replace the irredeemably state-controlled internet we have today, and from there I discovered his recent book, Program or be Programmed, which sounds like it might be a good one for our students:

I’ve downloaded it to read on my iPad (yes, I know, hardly a showcase of open architecture) and will report back when its read.

And that truly peer-to-peer internet reminds me of the xboxes the teenaged dissidents hooked up in Cory Doctorow’s wonderful Little Brother. Is it possible?

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