One great thing about living on a boat hotel is that there’s no wireless and so you can actually finish answering all your email because you can’t get any new email. In a little while I’ll go find a cafÈ with wireless, and I’ll post this, but for now, I’m finished and can read that book about blogging I’ve been meaning to read for months with a shiny, freshly polished good conscience.
Here too are various notes from responses to my talk which I’m sorry but I haven’t written about it here and probably won’t. It’s sort of kind of partly about the distributed narrative stuff but was rather, uh, networked conceptually. Oh, and there are some notes from other things at the seminar.

  • Lars recommends Alfred North Whitehead for a mggetaphysics of how to think about things that aren’t things and maybe even how to think without thinking of things at all. It took him all semester to read, he says, and he’ll have to reread it because it’s really dense, but it’s wonderful! From the 20s. I think my scribbled note that “Everything is an event and there are no objects” is connected to this.
  • Dagny is fascinated that I’m talking about some of the things she thinks about but with completely different words. Suggests I look into “boundary objects” which are things you have to do/pass to enter a discourse.
  • Arne, hearing how my students are learning to collaborate and some are disliking it intensely, remarked that although all employers insist that collaboration is the most important skill new employees can have, his economy students don’t see the point of it or want to do it either. He suggests a textbook by Monica Rolfsen and Morten Levin which is about how to collaborate, also an NTNU project called Eksperter i team where all students in the university have to collaborate with students in other disciplines.
  • Jyri Engestr¯m’s blog post noting that you can’t really have a social network without some kind of an object to share. I guess I’d add or an event or something else.

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The Machine Vision in Everyday Life project invites proposals for an interdisciplinary workshop using qualitative approaches and digital methods to analyse how machine vision is represented in art, science fiction, games, social media and other forms of cultural and aesthetic expression.