Here’s a great answer to the perennial “Where are the women bloggers” question (the ironic version posted earlier is even better, but this one spells it out which obviously needed to be done) and I also need to remember to think about the final paragraph for my distributed narrative thingmagig. I wonder whether that’s true? Must consider.

Now: must go meet girlfriend, drink beer.

2 thoughts on “note

  1. Norman

    Possibly most don’t dare comment on topics like this? The short answer is that although there are overlaps, male and female brains are different. Oooops. It slipped out.

  2. Jill

    Sure, and there’s also a huge amount of upbringing and cultural influence that affects the way men and women think and act. That still doesn’t answer why men every two or three months cry out “where are the women bloggers”, or “where are the women political bloggers” or “where are the women academic bloggers” just because their personal blogrolls don’t include many women, or because they don’t actually think of an academic blog that includes personal stuff as well as being academic, or of a feminist or anti-abortionist as being political. And as the post linked above says, the question itself is so androcentric. Which is fine if you’re a guy and admit that it’s the way you see the world (I don’t read women bloggers), but when presented as The Way The World Really Is (there are no women bloggers) it’s pretty annoying. To say the least.

    Ah well. Oh, Clancy has a list of links to a lot of the discussions on “where are the women bloggers”, if you want proof of our exhaustingly often it’s discussed.

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