4 thoughts on “nightmare

  1. Dennis G. Jerz

    I remember the first time I had the “There’s a test today and I’m not prepared” dream from the perspective of the teacher who forgot to create the test. I jokingly announced that to my students one day while passing out tests, and they agreed that that didn’t count as a nightmare. Some looked hopefully at the papers I was passing out, thinking that maybe I had forgotten after all and this paper was blank.

  2. Jill

    I don’t know, I think it’d pass as a nightmare. Not for them, maybe… Ayayayay.

  3. Tracy Kennedy

    Yeah – after reading her post about her nightmare a couple days ago, I had one of my own. You know, students revolting in class, telling you that you don’t know what you are talking about…then power point, computer and overhead not working etc etc. Luckily the class I taught this week went by fine. phew. I think this is common (I have a number of friends who are police officers, and they often dream that their gun doesn’t go off when confronted by a criminal).

  4. Jill

    The powerpoint, computer and overhead not working isn’t a nightmare, it’s STANDARD!

    Yesterday I actually dropped the overhead. I laughed and told the students I’d dropped my powerbook from a far greater height, and with no carpet, and everything was fine – but the overhead projector turned out to be done for. A tiny plastic tab that keeps the arm up had broken off and even with wads of paper I couldn’t get the arm to stay in a position where it would keep the words on the screen in focus.

    Probably that’s why my subconscious doesn’t bother plaguing me with nightmares.

    And dreaming your gun won’t fire when a bad guy’s trying to shoot you’d be worse. Unless you could run, I suppose.

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