This is my grandmother, Lorna, on a Christmas day in Perth in the eighties. She came to visit us in Norway when I was little and did yoga and when we visited her she had a cat and a dog and lived by the beach and when we were apart she would send us parcels of books but then the parcels stopped coming and she remembered less and less every time we visited her. She died more than a decade ago. I had forgotten this snippet of video sent me by my Uncle Ted.

Isn’t she beautiful?

7 thoughts on “Lorna

  1. weez

    yes. she is.

  2. Mum

    Wish I could see this. Any tips?

  3. mjones

    Very beautiful.

  4. Jill

    Oh dear mum, I tried to make it Windows-friendly, same as that Omitted video. You’re not seeing anything?

  5. Mum

    Nope. Not seeing a thing. Windows puts me in the wrong league I guess – but I have the advantage that I knew her. I can conjure her up in my mind from memories. I see her before me now. Yes. She was beautiful, charming and stunningly intelligent – a desparately difficult combination for a woman in Australia in her lifetime. Not that she ever saw it that way herself of course.

  6. RonaldJamesMcAuley

    I am David Walkers cousin and I read a letter from him at Aunt Lornas funeral in Perth. My late father John Lalor McAuley was James and Lornas brother. Regards to your father I had lunch with him a few years back in Perth. We are living in Melbourne. My Wife Margaret is a barrister & solicitor and Hon. Consul General for the Republic of FIJI. We have a son Peter James and daughter Elizabeth Catherin.

  7. George S. Patton

    Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity.

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