Olav Anders ÿvreb¯ writes about a recently announced new Norwegian search engine, Sesam, which will apparently do a kind of google news service where it pays news sources users click through to, and which will connect a lot of publically available information about people:

According to the newspaper, searching for a person’s name at Sesam will return not only web pages, but also address, phone number, overview over the person’s board memberships (!), photos of the person and articles about him or her in Norwegian newspapers the last 20 years (enter again the Retriever archives)!

Olav Anders raises lots of pertinent questions and has links; go read what he says.

Oh, btw, I haven’t corrected ZoomInfo’s information-gathering about me declaring me ex-prime minister of Denmark. A bit of positive misinformation never hurt 😉

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