“OK, everyone who’s interested in discussing games, definitions and narratives, over to that side of the room. Everyone interested in discussing Turkle’s 1984 article over to this side.”

All the boys went to the structuralist definition side. All the girls (only four out of fourteen students) went to the Turkle side. Usually I’ve tried to do a kind of summary of the small group discussions in plenary at the end of the class, but today I remembered what I was told at my university pedagogy course when I complained that I found the plenary summary difficult: “Are you sure that you need it? Perhaps you’re only doing the plenary because you need to feel there’s a result, and not because it helps the students learn?”

There aren’t enough computers in the room for each student to blog in class, so I asked them to jot down quick notes about what they would personally take from the class discussions and this week’s readings. And please blog it after class. Everyone was still writing when I left the room.

3 thoughts on “class

  1. Mattias

    This might look like gender something… I think not.

    All the girls (except one) already sat on that side of the room. The one that changed side did so because she has worked with the Juul article many times before and felt quite bored about his article. Also friends stick together on most discussions, unless they are divided.

    But funny anyway.

  2. Jill

    Oh, alright then, I’ll accept that 😉 And great to see you’ve been blogging!

  3. Solveig

    Well, I can’t say that I’m bored with Juuls paper (I like it a lot), but I’ve done nothing but discussing games and definitions this year:)

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