Tormod Carlsen is a Bergener who’s been active in the local neighbourhood associations for a while and is now considering entering more formal politics – and he’s blogging it at Bergensvalget. It’ll be interesting to see how it works out – I think the immediacy of blogging might work particularly well at such a local level. Another kind of local blogging was documented in the New York Times yesterday, in an article about college leaders who blog – with some interesting notes about the ways in which they blog, the kinds of things they blog, and students’ and others’ responses. I might have to forward it to our university rektor

2 thoughts on “local blogging: politicians and college leaders

  1. Martin

    Is it really called a Bergener in English? I didn’t know that.

  2. Jill

    If it isn’t, it should be 🙂

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