According to testimony to a Grand Jury, President Bush actually gave orders that the name of a CIA operative be leaked in order to punish her husband, who criticised the invasion of Iraq. So it’s not simply a matter of blaming the Vice-President: this is Bush himself.

It’s odd that Clinton got into so much trouble for a cigar, while Bush gets away with leaking classified information relating to the security of his country for revenge purposes, don’t you think?

PS: The Wikipedia is glorious for getting background and the full story on current news events. It also (generally) provides good links to sources. Traditional media, on the other hand, only rarely really provide background coverage – they’re meant to be thrown out or never listened to again, after all, so there’s little point. Except now they’re online there would be a point. Here’s Wikipedia’s stories on this scandal.

3 thoughts on “beyond absurd

  1. […] Les mer p?• jill/txt […]

  2. scott

    Bush is a bad man.

  3. Martin

    Bush is a bad bad man. I agree that Wikipedia is good for background reading. For instance, the very best page I have found online on the whole Mohammed caricature scandal is
    this page from Danish Wikipedia.
    It has extensive background info, timelines, footnotes galore, etc. You can clear
    up quite a few myths (e.g. the accepted truth that the crisis started when the Danish
    imams did their misinformation tour, thus making them responsible for the crisis instead
    of Jyllands-Posten. In fact, the protests had been gathering steam for over a month. )

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