Via Tama Leaver, I found this great overview of who owns what from Amy Webb– as you can see, Google, Yahoo and the rest are far more likely than Murdoch, at this point, to end up controlling our media lives in five or ten years time. Amy Webb suggests printing it out from the PDF and hanging it up in your cubicle. I need something for my office door: this might be it.
overview of ownership of web 2.0 sites

Oh, and if you simply want a list of a thousand web 2.0 sites, irrespective of who owns them, here you go: Web 2.0’s top 100 List (via Steven Rubel at Micro Persuasion, who also critiques Amy Webb’s post, saying that despite this apparent conglomeration, web 2.0 sites are constantly expanding – anybody can start a new site. Of course, if it’s good, it’ll likely then get bought up.

1 Comment

  1. […] Via jill/txt again, Amy Webb provides a visual of who owns what in Web 2.0. Turns out Google and Yahoo! own a heck of a lot more than arch-villain Rupert Murdoch. […]

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