Did you ever think of playing oboe when you were a child? Probably not; in fact, it’s pretty much impossible for a child to play a standard oboe, with its complicated mechanics and steep lung requirements. My sister is an oboist in Kristiansand symfoniorkester, and on a crusade to recruit new oboists – because orchestras of the world struggle to find them. Marion’s found tiger oboes, oboes specially designed so children as young as six can play them, and she’s just starting up the first ever kids’ oboe class at the Kristiansand kulturskole. Being a performer and story-teller at heart, Marion has decided the black and yellow striped kids’ oboes are clearly relatives of tigers – and so she’s written a story about how the oboe got its stripes, and has even struck a deal with the zoo where the young oboists get to play music for the tigers and visit the zoo regularly.

Marion Walker photographed by Fedrelandsvennen

So far there are no hits on google for tiger oboe, but if Marion has her way that will definitely change. Here she is in on NRK S¯rlandet at the launch – at the zoo, playing for a tiger, of course!

2 thoughts on “tiger oboes

  1. […] I read it here. […]

  2. J. Nathan Matias

    As an orchestral musician, I think this is fabulous!

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