Oh dear. This year my lass actually has the freebie that came with a Donald Duck magazine as an advent calendar, and that’s it. Not that she doesn’t seem happy about it, but seeing Looby Lu’s makes me squirm with guilt. It’s even environmentally friendly: activities, not toys! The Donald Duck one won’t really lead to toys, just to rampant commercialism and unrealistic Christmas wishlists: turns out there are little quizzes every day and you go to the website and guess and you can win this ridiculous assortment of snowboards, game consoles and electronic guitars. And get stuck playing games on disney.no for an hour.

I’m such a bad mother. I mean, just look at that beautiful box of origami-papered activities. Oh dear. It’s almost made worse by knowing that it probably didn’t take more than 30 minutes to actually just do. And she has a Flickr set.

No, haven’t put up any decorations yet either.

4 thoughts on “the guilt of christmas

  1. Jason

    It could be worse. You could be saying to yourself, “My child is only 6 months old, he’ll never know if we don’t do a full blow xmas”, or allow terrible santa picture like this one to be taken. Maybe he’ll forgive us one day.

    Decorations are overrated; we enjoy being the dark house on the block. I’m just waiting to get the nasty letter from the home owners association.

  2. scott

    What you need is an inflatable snow globe for the front lawn. That’ll make your child happy AND impress your neighbors.

  3. Jill

    I’m getting the snow globe. Already did the terrible santa picture 🙂

  4. jill/txt » celebrations and costumes

    […] Don’t feel too sorry for us though. Here the dress-up-in-costume-and-get-sweets-from-the-neighbours-day is New Year’s Eve (or between Christmas and New Year in other parts of Norway) when kids always, always, always go carolling and always come home with ridiculous quantities of sweets. Norwegian kids get presents EVERY DAY in December in their advent calendars, which have little to do with religion in today’s Norway and everything to do with daily individually wrapped presents. (This year I have a nice big one ready with lots of pockets, and I bought the first present yesterday – much better than that horrid Donald Duck calendar she had two years ago, and that Tom reminded me of at the Edit 8.0 conference. Me, I’d managed to obliterate that memory of bad parenting, but the blog doesn’t lie. Well, not much. […]

Leave A Comment

Recommended Posts

Machine Vision

Cultural Representations of Machine Vision: An Experimental Mixed Methods Workshop

Call for submissions to a workshop, Bergen, Norway
Workshop dates: 15-17 August 2022
Proposals due: 15 June

The Machine Vision in Everyday Life project invites proposals for an interdisciplinary workshop using qualitative approaches and digital methods to analyse how machine vision is represented in art, science fiction, games, social media and other forms of cultural and aesthetic expression.

Digital Humanities Machine Vision

What do different machine vision technologies do in fiction and art?

For the Machine Vision in Everyday Life project we’ve analysed how machine vision technologies are portrayed and used in 500 works of fiction and art, including 77 digital games, 190 digital artworks and 233 movies, novels and other narratives. You can browse […]

AI and algorithmic culture Presentations

My talk on caring AIs in recent sci-fi novels

I’m giving a talk at an actual f2f academic conference today, Critical Borders, Radical Re(visions) of AI, in Cambridge. I was particularly excited to see this conference because it’s organised by the people who edited AI Narratives A History of Imaginative Thinking […]