I just gave a talk for Forskning.no’s seminar about research dissemination/popularisation, Fra forskning til forside v3.0. Here are the slides:

I had to leave right after my talk, because my Remix Culture students are presentating their research projects at noon, but I was able to hear Ove Dalen‘s talk before mine about how to write online. He gave an engaging presentation with some interesting points: did you know that we now read more of an article presented online than we would if it were presented on paper? Also, while Jacob Nielsen in 1997 found that 80% of us scan online texts rather than reading them, that number’s dropped to around 50% according to a study by Poynter in 2009 (I’ll have to ask Ove Dalen for a more complete source for that: luckily he’s on Twitter so that’ll be easy!). Oh, and the first thing we notice on a website? The text, not the images. Ove Dalen has written a couple of books on writing for the web, and gives classes frequently, so I’ve seen his work online regularly over the last years, but this is the first time I’ve heard him speak in person.

4 thoughts on “talk on research dissemination in social media

  1. Mike Caulfield

    "We now read more of an article presented online than we would if it were presented on paper" : http://bit.ly/213Dsg

  2. CELT Keene

    "We now read more of an article presented online than we would if it were presented on paper" : http://bit.ly/213Dsg

  3. Ove Dalen

    Hi, Jill. You can find more details about the last big eyetrack study by Poynter here: http://www.slideshare.net/coolstuff/poynter-eyetracking-study-march-07

    The whole study (from 2007 – not 2009) are avaliable as a book “Eyetracking the news”: http://www.amazon.com/Eyetracking-News-Sara-Quinn/dp/0979868505

  4. Tord Høivik

    J. Nielsen,1997; 80% of us scan online texts rather than read them. Number’s dropped to ca. 50% in 2009 (Poynter) http://jilltxt.net/?p=2446

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