The short paper deadline for Hypertext 2005 was just extended till June 16. Have you ever written a short paper? I love them. They’re perfect for when you never got time to write the longer paper you were thinking of, or when you blogged something cool but that probably wouldn’t really make a whole paper of its own, or if you’re just starting to think of an idea.

So you know I’m on the program committee. I’m co-chair for literary papers, that is papers about literary hypertext. George Landow’s chair for more general humanities papers. Mark Bernstein is chair for hypertexts, that is papers submitted as hypertexts, because yes, you can do that. Anders Fagerjord’s paper for the conference is written as a stretchtext, which is pretty damn cool. Look, here’s a list of the accepted full papers.

We’re going to put together a panel on blogs, and the program committee is thinking of maybe making blogs a theme or their own next year, if there seems to be enough interest. (It wasn’t even my idea!) Hypertext has a very rich history and I think it’d be great to combine the knowledge of that community with the knowledge of us bloggers.

So if you think you might like to come to Salzburg in September this year, send in a short paper! As a hypertext, if you like. Or as a 2-3 page standard paper (there’s a template with tiny fonts so really you can fit about 2000-2500 words in if you want). And ask me if you have any questions!

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