I finally revised the definition I wrote of “weblog” for the Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative and sent it back to the editors. The changes were mostly small, the one I like best being a suggestion from an editor that I weave in something like “the standard genre expectation is of non-fiction”. So I did. What a quick summarisation of the whole truth/fiction debates.

Because there are lots of links to what is in fact a final draft rather than a final version, I pasted the new revised and hopefully finally final version into the same post as the previous version.

Oh, I sent the definition through the Gender Genie, too, thinking that it was so seriously written that it must be masculine, but no. Written by a woman, says the genie. Indeed.

3 thoughts on “revised definition

  1. nick

    However, the author of this blog entry, “Revised Definition,” is, according, to Gender Genie, male!

  2. Jill

    Oops. I wonder who WAS the author, then?

    The comments to my post on the Gender Genie, btw, point out many problems with it that I was too hasty to see – but yeah. Definitely. What you said.

  3. Blog de Halavais

    But wait. What if I’m a girl?*
    Jill pointed to the Gender Genie, which employs a heuristic involving the use of particular words to infer whether you…

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