I’m off to Copenhagen tomorrow, for Anne Mette Thorhauge’s PhD defence. Her thesis is on communication between players in computer games, and she argues that the rules of the game are actually conventions agreed upon by the players rather than hardcoded into the software. I’m thinking of asking her to talk about the Leeroy video… It’ll be interesting to switch roles and be an opponent, don’t you think?

Update: Anne Mette did a great job, sticking to her guns throughout the defense. Jonas Heide Smith posted a photo and a brief commentary.

3 thoughts on “off to copenhagen

  1. Mario Gerosa

    Hi, sorry to write in a post, but I couldn’t send you an email.

    I am Mario Gerosa, author of a book about virtual worlds (http://www.castelvecchieditore.com/catalog/title/index.php?cmd=ext&title_id=351&subclass=) and one about Second Life (www.meltemieditore.it). Now I am working on a book about the 3D web and the social networks. I am just writing a chapter where I try do define which directions will take literature. I was thinking about chat as a new form of roman epistolaire, and about the literary chronicles of virtual worlds as a form of legitimization for them. Then, reading the book Second Person I was intrigued by distributed narrative and I found your blog.
    I would like very much to interview you, via email or skype about your research, to understand distributed narratives better.
    I wish to thank you in advance. And please, since I am in a hurry, just tell me yes or not asap.
    Thanks.

    Mario Gerosa

  2. Linn

    OMG! Can’t wait to read this, because it is so fundamentally true! We wouldn’t have situations like the one in EVE Online unless it was! Very excited about this! And definitely a thing we’ve discussed a lot at State of Play!

  3. Norman Hanscombe

    Since the paper was in Danish, Jill, I had no more luck working it out than did nelson with his telescope while visiting the Copenhagen area. I’ll have to remain puzzled re how a game’s rules could be anything other than “in” the computer. Ahh for the days when there were technological breakthroughs with which I could cope, such as the introduction of the biro.

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