Goodness. I had no idea that ?• blogge (Norwegian for “to blog”) is also perfectly good (though somewhat rare) Norwegian for piercing a fish with a sharp instrument until blood runs from it. It comes from old Norse, blo??ga, and is (possibly) still used in some parts of the country. Blog was also the name of a character in an old Superman comic. Thank you for the useful information, Digme.

6 thoughts on “many meanings of blog

  1. Torill

    Actually, “bl??gge” is a quite common word around here, and that is perhaps the more frequently used version of the “piercing the big vein at the throath of a fish with a knife in order to make it bleed.” So three versions: blogge, bl??gge, blodge.

    So I guess, if a blogger goes for the throath, that’s traditional in Norway…

  2. Lars

    That’s amazing. I always thought “bl??gge” was the only way to spell the fish-slaughtering thing, and I’ve travelled the coast from Bergen to Russia extensively. Probably a southern dialect thing.
    On a completely tangential note, one of my all time favourite album titles comes from Troms??-based folk band Boknakaran: “Unbl??gged”.

  3. H?•kon Styri

    I guess the closest you’ll get in English is looking up the ethymology of “bleed”.

    I don’t know about the usefullness, but my blog’s seen lots of visitors searching for the blog/blogg word and posting about it was overdue.

  4. Jill

    Bl??gge? Ah well, I don’t actually know either word, so I’ll trust anyone’s opinion here!

  5. torill

    Lars: “Boknakaran”? Oh, that’s a cute name. (And for english speakers – it means guys who are salted and partially dried, but not completely, just cured enough that they keep fairly well in the winter. No, not normally used for men, the usual “bokna” thing is hering – “boknasild”. The taste is definitely aquired.)

  6. Jill

    The taste for the men or the herring?

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