They’ve announced where the next Hypertext conferences will be. Usually the conference has alternated between the US and Europe, but the conference hasn’t been able to find a site in the US for 2006, so it’ll be in Denmark in 2006, and in Austria in 2007. Unfortunately that means that the Americans who didn’t come this year because it was too expensive will have the same problem next year.

There have been even fewer of the literary people here than usual – though admittedly, I’m not sure what’s usual anymore, since the previous time I attended was four years ago. Still, it’s unusual, sure, to have a hypertext conference without Mark Bernstein, Stuart Moulthrop (who won the Best Paper award for “What the Geeks Know“, but unfortunately couldn’t be there to present his paper), Elli Mylonas, David Durand, Wendy Hall, Cathy Marshall, David Kolb, Deena Larsen, Jim Rosenberg or George Landow. There were, however, a lot of young people, which might be a good thing. There were some really interesting presentations. I particularly enjoyed Clare Hooper’s StorySpinner (full text), Anders Fagerjord and Tor Brekke Skj¯tskifte’s work on stretch video (oh dear, Ander’s paper was written as a hypertext and isn’t in the ACM digital library yet…) and Nathan Matias’ Philadelphia Fullerine (full text). And the conversations, demos and the food great.

1 Comment

  1. Deena

    I missed you guys too, but have loved following the new developments. 🙂

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