Got the student evaluations for last year’s class. I just skimmed them (too much else to do right now, I’ll look at it later) but I noticed a lovely question about how much work the students put into this course. Now the course is 15 credits, and full time students should take 30 credits each semester. So given a standard work week of 37,5 hours, students should expect to spend about 18 hours a week on my course. A few did.

10 Hvor mange timer i uken bruker du p?• emnet totalt, det vil si selvstudier, forelesning og annen undervisning? (How many hours a week do you spend on this course in total, including independent work as well as attending lectures and other classes?)

  no.students %
No answer 2 6
10 hours or less 11 33
11-16 hours 11 33
17-20 hours 4 12
21-25 hours 3 9
26 hours or more 2 6
Total 33 99

Actually this probably isn’t bad, and I just love those two students who spent more than 26 hours a week on the class.

The next question on the form asks whether they think the amount of work required is appropriate for the number of credits. TEN chose not to answer! Almost all the others said “about right”.

Next year I’m going to work them so much harder.

3 thoughts on “how much do students work?

  1. Johanka

    Your course is “worth” half of your students credit quota? I wish the university courses I took (in the Czech Republic) were that good…

  2. Dave Shearon

    Any correlation between time spent and grades? Any idea of intrinsic satisfaction compared to time spent? Do the surveys suggest why the great range in time spent, or does your experience with the students allow you to guess?

  3. James

    Interesting to see you also have feedback questionnaires. My modules are ¬º of a semester so maybe students should expect to spend 9 hours per week … my University suggests something like 13 hours (maybe we have a longer working week <grin>) Sadly few get near that!

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