I don’t usually like memes, you know, those things where someone in a blog answers sixty questions and tags other people to answer the same questions. I quite enjoyed the pseudonymous bloggers post photos of their eyes meme the other day though, and here’s a meme I just have to copy: Post the last word of your dissertation.

Three years after finishing it I still get random jolts of amazement and joy that I actually finished my PhD dissertation. The last word of it? Well, I had no idea – but most fittingly, it was the plural form of the first word of the title:

fictions.

How fitting, given that’s what the dissertation was actually about (though I couldn’t have told you that until a few months before the end…)

[Other last words: over the top, environment, requests…]

4 thoughts on “fictions

  1. […] There’s a meme going about, and although I fon’t normally like them this is reasonably entertaining. (came from See Jane Compute via Jill/txt) The last word of my PhD thesis is ‘field’.¬† This is actually quite fitting as I used Bourdieu’s critical conflict theory to provide an analysis of the diplomatic field. […]

  2. […] Actually posting just the last word of your dissertation is exactly the same kind of hide-and-seek now-you-see-me-now-you-don’t game that pseudonymous bloggers get to indulge in all the time. Look, here’s a photo of all of me except my face. Look, now I’m mentioning enough about the town I’m visiting that you could almost guess where I am. Look, here’s a photo of my eyes and nothing else. I wrote about that in my Mirrors and Shadows paper, and it really fascinates me. Viviane Serfaty talks about it too in her aptly titled study of weblogs and diaries, The Mirror and the Veil. […]

  3. […] Anyway, the second post on Jill’s blog of interest to me this morning was about a meme on what’s the last word in your dissertation. Kinda cute, I thought, so I pulled my dusty copy off of the shelf and looked: […]

  4. JoseAngel

    Last words last…

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