I’m not going to get away from it, realistically, am I? Amazon gives you a discount if you use their A9 search engine – which disconcertingly remembers not just my name, but also a couple of slightly embarrassing searches I did in 2003. Google probably already stores every search I do, anyway, given Blogger recognises me by name when I go there and Google owns Blogger. (Btw, A9 isn’t a new search engine. It uses the Google algorithm, but displays stuff differently.)

I must remember to use the SwitchProxy extension to Firefox and go via an anonymous proxy next time I want to do an embarrassing search.

3 thoughts on “embarrassing searches

  1. bicyclemark

    What qualifies as an embarassing search these days anyway?

  2. Jill

    Oh, those late-night searches, you know, the ones where you get obsessive and think your child might have some strange disease, or your that guy who keeps talking to you in the library might have a psychic disorder or some sexual fetish might be rather fascinating or there might be some kind of support group for your girlfriend’s relationship problems, or you’ve been looking for photos of your lover and his exes or whatever, you know, I suppose they’re not really that embarrassing, in a way, but I like to think of them as between me and my powerbook. It’s disconcerting seeing them all lined up every time I go to a search engine.

  3. bicyclemark

    Ah.. yes.. everytime I look through my browsers history I think… “Who the hell are you?” and then I delete it all and say “im a new man!”
    Have fun in Sussex… say hi to the U of Amsterdam people, cause they’re my people, I’m hoping they meet my favorite bloggers since I’m not there to do it myself.

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