I found this quote in Trevor Scholz’s blog (and may I say that post is a lovely example of how you can blog a classroom discussion using links and narration – students, please try to emulate that!):

A recent survey conducted by Kelton Research discovered that a majority of Americans (52-percent) said their “most recent experience with a computer problem provoked emotions such as anger, sadness or alienation,” yet a whopping 65-percent of these same folks spend more time with their beloved computer than their own spouse (Engadget)

The logic of the comparison isn’t quite compelling. I mean, I could say that wow, for 99% of women, their bras touch their breasts for more time than their boyfriends do, without that proving anything very useful about women, bras, breasts or boyfriends other than that bras and boyfriends are good for entirely different things. But there’s a certain frisson to it that made me blog it anyway.

4 thoughts on “do you spend more time with your computer than with your spouse?

  1. Lesley

    Hee hee. Love the comparison.

  2. Mark Federman

    65% of those surveyed spent more time with their computers than their spouses. And for the other 35% it was with the television! LOL

  3. Trebor Scholz

    Hi Jill,

    The isolated fact of spending more time with one’s computer than one’s spouse is not so telling. In LA, where I currently am, most probably people spend more time in their cars than with their partner’s as well. But, if you link this study to others that we know already, it reaffirms a picture of addiction: people hide computer use from their loved ones, and are glued to screens most of the day.

    best,
    Trebor (with B as in bra)

  4. Jason

    I think Trebor’s mom just liked tv better than him. pish.

Leave A Comment

Recommended Posts

Machine Vision

Cultural Representations of Machine Vision: An Experimental Mixed Methods Workshop

Call for submissions to a workshop, Bergen, Norway
Workshop dates: 15-17 August 2022
Proposals due: 15 June

The Machine Vision in Everyday Life project invites proposals for an interdisciplinary workshop using qualitative approaches and digital methods to analyse how machine vision is represented in art, science fiction, games, social media and other forms of cultural and aesthetic expression.

Digital Humanities Machine Vision

What do different machine vision technologies do in fiction and art?

For the Machine Vision in Everyday Life project we’ve analysed how machine vision technologies are portrayed and used in 500 works of fiction and art, including 77 digital games, 190 digital artworks and 233 movies, novels and other narratives. You can browse […]

AI and algorithmic culture Presentations

My talk on caring AIs in recent sci-fi novels

I’m giving a talk at an actual f2f academic conference today, Critical Borders, Radical Re(visions) of AI, in Cambridge. I was particularly excited to see this conference because it’s organised by the people who edited AI Narratives A History of Imaginative Thinking […]