The new Ândsverkslov or intellectual property rights law here in Norway is one of the things I clearly should be paying attention to but have no time or energy for. NRK has lots of articles about it, and one that makes me feel even guiltier about not paying enough attention is the one that argues that that suggestion that it would be illegal to break the copy protection on a CD you legally bought in order to transfer the music to your own mp3-player (remember?) was just a publicity gimmick that worked: the tabloids and everyone picked that up, heck, the young socialists dressed up as iPods and demonstrated in front of parliament, and we got so upset about this patently ridiculous suggestion that we didn’t notice all the other far worse aspects of the law.

Anyway: the NRK article suggests that consumers are getting a far worse deal (making it legal for rights owners to browse our personal media collections? really?) yet the rights holders are screaming because, for instance, the new law allows non-profit use, for instance by councils, which sounds kind of weird in a way.

Are there any informed bloggers discussing this? I checked EFN’s website, but there’s nothing much there. I assume there is in their mailing list, but oh dear, I should, but I don’t have time…

3 thoughts on “copyright law in Norway

  1. Lars

    Eirik Newth has been following this for a while. I suppose he counts as an informed blogger… some links to other sources in the comments.

  2. Jill

    Oh of course. And yes, Eirik Newth is definitely an informed blogger 🙂

  3. Johan

    Gisle Hannemyr is not really a blogger, but he is quite informed and has put something on the web: http://folk.uio.no/gisle/essay/indexno.html

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