I’m going to try to start blogging again, as a way to make myself more accountable to myself. I used to use my blog as a research journal, writing little bits and pieces and saving links and stray thoughts, and often I would use bits of blog posts when writing papers and books. People don’t really use blogs like that any more. Most blog posts are more like polished essays than thinking-while-you-write, or Thinking With My Fingers as Torill titled her blog years ago. Some people used their blogs to document their research process, but I used mine to do my research. And to think about how to organise my days and my time, or how to deal with new responsibilities and tasks. Now I’m nearly 50 and nobody accuses me of looking like a student anymore as they did in 2005 (ha) and that outsider peeking into the ivory tower stance certainly doesn’t work anymore. I’ll have to find a new voice, perhaps, if I start blogging again.

I started today by writing my notes about a novel I just read as a blog post instead of just for myself.

One step at a time.

Maybe trying to write a short blog post every day is a way to get myself back into research, get myself back, after this pandemic slump of a year.

3 thoughts on “Can I blog my way out of my pandemic slump?

  1. Petter

    Great idea! I grew up reading blogs that where actually discussing with each other through low barrier posts. There was a huge Swedish blog scene on the topics I was interested in. I was thinking doing the same thing – start up a blog to write unfinished stuff too. Maybe I’ll do it now!

  2. Francois Lachance

    Here’s wishing you all the best on the blogging-in-public renewal from an old reader who appreciates your postings. Curious how the renewal might unfold.

  3. Sunday | Morgan's Log

    […] And Jill/txt is back: Can I blog my way out of my pandemic slump? – jill/txt […]

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