“Research has proven that people who use a worry time find themselves worrying 35 percent less of the time within four weeks.” Don’t ya love the certainty of percentages and the unspecified “research”? So, the idea is that if you make an appointment with yourself that between 5.00 and 5.30 pm every day, for instance, you will worry, you’ll worry less the rest of the day.

Right. Sure. But when do you think the most optimal time for daily worrying is? I don’t know. Mornings? Would that let you get it over with or would it poison the rest of the day? See, this is really complicated. Worrying, really. (via 43 folders, productivity porn)

“Research has proven that people who use a worry time find themselves worrying 35 percent less of the time within four weeks.” Don’t ya love the certainty of percentages and the unspecified “research”? So, the idea is that if you make an appointment with yourself that between 5.00 and 5.30 pm every day, for instance, you will worry, you’ll worry less the rest of the day.

Right. Sure. But when do you think the most optimal time for daily worrying is? I don’t know. Mornings? Would that let you get it over with or would it poison the rest of the day? See, this is really complicated. Worrying, really. (via 43 folders)

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Machine Vision

Cultural Representations of Machine Vision: An Experimental Mixed Methods Workshop

Call for submissions to a workshop, Bergen, Norway
Workshop dates: 15-17 August 2022
Proposals due: 15 June

The Machine Vision in Everyday Life project invites proposals for an interdisciplinary workshop using qualitative approaches and digital methods to analyse how machine vision is represented in art, science fiction, games, social media and other forms of cultural and aesthetic expression.