We finished it! Last Friday, two days before the deadline, Hilde and I sent the whole World of Warcraft anthology off to MIT Press! And look, Hilde’s photo shows it was a really big wad of paper (oh, they got it electronically too, never fear):

One of the best things about editing this anthology has been seeing just how wonderfully all the contributions have turned out. We started with a lot of good ideas, and the workshop last November was amazingly inspiring, but even with all that, I’ve been genuinely impressed at how interesting and well-written the final articles are. I can’t wait to see it in print.

Here’s the table of contents, just to whet your appetites. The title hasn’t been completely finalised yet, so we’ll get back to you about that. Now, how long does it usually take from a book is sent to the publisher and till it’s in print? I’m assuming we’ll have to wait a while…

Introduction
Hilde G. Corneliussen and Jill Walker Rettberg: îOrc Professor LFG,î or, Researching in Azeroth

Culture
1. Scott Rettberg: Corporate Ideology in World of Warcraft
2. Esther MacCallum-Stewart: “Never Such Innocence Again”: War and Histories in World of Warcraft
3. Hilde Corneliussen: World of Warcraft as a Playground for Feminism
4. Jessica Langer: The Familiar and the Foreign: Playing (Post)Colonialism in World of Warcraft

World
5. Espen Aarseth: A Hollow World: World of Warcaft as Spatial Practice
6. Tanya Krzywinska: World Creation and Lore: World of Warcraft as Rich Text
7. Lisbeth Klastrup: What makes World of Warcraft a World? A Note on Death and Dying
8. Jill Walker Rettberg: Quests in World of Warcraft: Deferral and Repetition

Play
9. T.L. Taylor: Does World of Warcraft Change Everything? How a PvP Server, Multinational Playerbase, and Surveillance Mod Scene Caused Me Pause
10. Torill Elvira Mortensen: Humans Playing World of Warcraft: or Deviant Strategies?
12. Esther MacCallum-Stewart and Justin Parsler: Role-play vs Gameplay. The difficulties of playing a role in World of Warcraft

Identity
12. Ragnhild Tronstad: Character identification in World of Warcraft: The relationship between capacity and appearance
13. Charlotte Hagstrˆm: Playing with Names: Gaming and Naming in World of Warcraft

12 thoughts on “World of Warcraft anthology sent to MIT Press!

  1. Shaping Youth

    Jill, I’d like to interview you and/or podcast about your anthology for our site.
    We only grazed the WoW phenom in this post, http://www.shapingyouth.org/blog/?p=13
    touching upon the marketer’s salivation over ‘sticky eyeballs’ with MMORPGS.

    I’m sure you could open up tons of insight for us all. I went to this PARC forum
    talk at Stanford http://www.parc.xerox.com/cms/get_article.php?id=569
    to hear Nick Yee speak on some of his WoW research…all I can say is WOW!
    You can Skype me on Shaping Youth or ping me on our blog while the site’s
    under construction.

    No rush, I’m swamped until May and blog backlogged but wanted to touch base and introduce our nonprofit consortium of academics, media mavens, parents and teens out to use
    the power of media for positive change.

  2. Tama

    Congratulations! In the words of Rocky Horror‘s Frank N Furter (who really would have fit in just fine in a virtual world), I shiver with AN TI CI … … … PAtion! 🙂

  3. Jill

    Thanks, Tama! We’re pretty thrilled, too! And Shaping Youth, sure! Just email me at jill.walker@uib.no.

  4. JosÈ Angel

    Wow! Congratulations!

  5. […] TOC of the WoW anthology to be published by MIT Press […]

  6. jill/txt »

    […] Until September 1, 2007, most of my research time will be spent writing a book on blogging for Polity Press, which is due to be published in 2008. I also recently finished co-editing an anthology of essays on World of Warcraft with Hilde Corneliussen, and it should be published by MIT Press in Spring 2007. […]

  7. […] Look out for The World of Warcraft Reader, anthology of scholarly essays on World of Warcraft, edited by Jill Walker Rettberg and Hilde Corneliussen and coming from MIT Press, Spring 2007! […]

  8. […] Look out for The World of Warcraft Reader, anthology of scholarly essays on World of Warcraft, edited by Jill Walker Rettberg and Hilde Corneliussen and coming from MIT Press, Spring 2007! […]

  9. […] MIT Press sent us the copyedited version of the World of Warcraft Reader last week, so now Hilde and I, and most of the contributors, are going through the manuscript considering all those little red marks. I must say, I’m really impressed with the job the MIT Press copyeditor, Krista Magnuson has done. She’s combined an astounding attention to detail (hey, you didn’t actually refer to this article in your chapter, but you put it in the bibliography. You need a URL for that reference, here it is. You need to spell out numbers like that, but not numbers like this.) with a very fluid ability to make deft little changes to a sentence that make it more understandable and more elegant. […]

  10. […] MIT Press requested a photo of Hilde and I to use in promoting our World of Warcraft anthology (which you can already preorder on Amazon!). Makes sense. Sure. But both Hilde and I enjoy having our photos taken about as much as we enjoy going to the dentist. […]

  11. […] Scott and I are going to be at the Chicago Metaverse Meetup on Thursday, which I’m really looking forward to. Jeremy Hunsinger is one of the organisers, and the crowd sounds great: people interested in online worlds of various sorts. They’re interested in the World of Warcraft Reader, so I’ll have to print out some of the flyers MIT Press sent us. […]

  12. […] World of Warcraft Anthology Sent to MIT Press (author‚Äôs blog) […]

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