Ugh. When I got to my office this morning a window was slightly open, stuff on the shelf by the window had been knocked down, there were muddy footprints on the floor between the window and the desk and the external monitor I use with my laptop was gone. The iMac was still there, weirdly enough. Nothing else was gone either – really there’s nothing else of monetary value in the room. The books are valuable to me, obviously, but hardly to thieves.

Turning on the iMac I feel worried. How much could they have accessed if they’d taken it? How many websites would my browser remember my username to? I set my computers so you have to type in a password to access many things (email, remembered passwords etc) but the information is in there if you can get past the password.

“We’ll just have to stop keeping personal things on our office computers,” the secretary said. That sounds sensible but is almost impossible when work and life overlap in so many ways. Sure, I don’t have to check my bank account or check personal mail at the office but what about my blog, my work email, the dozens of websites that have my username, my calendar info…

Ugh. Good thing the thieves thought the iMac was too heavy to lug out the window.

11 thoughts on “theft

  1. vika

    Gah. I’m so sorry. 🙁

  2. Martin

    That’s terrible! I’ve thought about how people could climb into your section, now
    that the container provides access to the roof. I’ll tell people in my study hall to be careful about leaving their computers.

  3. Stephanie

    Oh Jill! I am so sorry to hear that!

  4. Jill

    Well, you know, they didn’t steal the iMac, just a boring old monitor that wasn’t even worth very much really. Bu tit’s unpleasant knowing my office isn’t secure…

  5. Knut

    If you don¥t have done it already, I recommend that you turn ON the login-password on your iMac. I also think your keychain is protected with an heavy encryption, so that if the thiefes don’t have got your root-password, you can rely on that your data is pretty safe. The fact that they didn’t steal your mac, tells me they wouldn’t have a clue how to hack into your stuff either (i dont know if that even is possible).

    Hurray for the great OS X, and hurray for backups 😉

  6. Jill

    I do have the login password ON (as my family members frequently complain) and it’s got a cunning password – so yes, if the keychain thing really works I guess my data would be fairly safe. Let’s hope I never have to find out 🙂

  7. Tore Vesterby

    Who would’ve thought that theives have no taste?

    And what is it with you researchers up in Norway always getting your IT equipment stolen? I recall Torill getting her laptop stolen a little more than a year ago.

    But seriously, tough break there, Jill. Having your place looted is never pleasant.

  8. torill

    Oh, I know the feeling! Scary! Good thing all they took was the monitor.

  9. Jill

    Yes, I remember Torill’s being stolen – that was far worse, as it was her actual laptop. I’m just spooked at the thought of my laptop or imac being stolen…

  10. Hilde

    Ouch, that’s not nice!
    Good thing we’ll soon move up a floor.

  11. Jill

    Yeah, I know – I think it’ll be a lot harder to climb up there!

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