Kulturnett Norge gave me a call last week and asked if I could talk at a seminar they had today in Bergen – they wanted something on web communication, they said. Kulturnett.no is a rather cool site and system that connects all cultural organisations in Norway – museums, libraries, literary organisations and so on – imagine the potential!

So I did some surfing this weekend and it turns out that “museoblogging” is this whole new thing. One inspiring find was Jim Spadaccini’s blog with roundups of museums, blogs and community sites, and in particular his powerpoint for a presentation he gave back in March on Museum and Web 2.0. My other favourite find was the Walker Art Centre’s blogs, which are marvellous. They even blogged about their guidelines for their blogging staff. Here’s a great summary of what a museum blog might have that would make it worthwhile:

Ösomething more personal, something thatís not going be on the official website. Perhaps press/reviews regarding exhibitions from publications, reviews of staff, of programming and/or performance, curatorial insights, anecdotes about installation, execution, general thoughts, images, artist interviews that are included in current exhibitions, etc. Anything that supplements and rounds out the programming and, perhaps, includes the viewer. Blogs can make the possibilities of what an institution can do endless and with ease. (Caryn Coleman)

I piled a lot of screenshots into a powerpoint for this talk, and since I found Jim Spadaccini’s powerpoint so useful, I thought I should share mine as well. So here it is, in Norwegian, and mostly screenshots to be honest, but with URLs as appropriate: Nettformidling 2.0. Or you can click through it right here, thanks to Slideshare.net:

(Mind you, the font’s messed up. I guess maybe it’s Mac-specific. Pity.)

2 thoughts on “talk: museoblogging and communication

  1. Jon

    Since your presentation on tuesday I have thought quite a lot about whether it is true that peoples identity is becoming more dependent on connections than places. I guess this follow some of the same development as Castells describe by the terms “space of flows” and “space of places”, where he argues that the latter become relatively less important.

    No one doubts that we are more connected to more people than ever before by different media, but I am not convinced that this by any means reduce the importance of place. Therefore I was happy to be made aware of an article called “In defense of Places” by Wim Wenders. Wenders has made some of the best films I can think of about personal identity and his examples are beautiful….

    http://www.dga.org/news/v28_4/craft_wendersplaces.php3

    When it comes to museums I do believe they are going to make a big mistake if they come to belive that connections between their users can be achieved in virtual spaces, especially if they loose some of their focus on the museums and galleries as unique places.

  2. Justin

    Glad you like our blog and that it was useful to your presentation. We’re doing a presentation at Museums and the Web 2007 on the same topic.

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