In a linky mood? Try linking to elinor.nu!

See, nobody on the whole web has linked to ELINOR‘s site except me. Not very surprising, I guess, since I’ve not announced it and all it had on it till today was “this site will be constructed and we’re going to do cool stuff for e-lit in the Nordic countries”, but now it’s got info about the seminar, and a nicer design (I used glish.com’s 2 column template and cut and pasted) and our nice new logo, which is inspired by a papyrus scroll, unrolling, see, and it looks a little like an @, too. It was designed by Torill Gallefoss. We might change the colours, we’ve had some discussions, we’ll see. And of course the website’s still a fledling – the catalogue’ll grow and it’ll be bloggified. But you’ll link even to a fledgling, won’t you? Tell the world about it? Come to the e-litteraturfest if you’re nearby?

I know it’s all in Norwegian, but see, non-Norwegians could link and say, look, I can’t read this, but isn’t it cool they’re doing this e-lit thing in Norway?

Shameless, aren’t I?

13 thoughts on “shameless plea

  1. elzapp

    Not just you

  2. Jill

    You’re right! I wonder why I couldn’t find that on google – lovelyl Lars 🙂 Thanks!

  3. Jason

    An off-topic comment, but ever since you redid your CSS a few weeks ago, your layout has been broken for my WinXP Pro, IE 6.0 browser. For example, this comments box slides under the “current research” sidebar (so if there are any spelling errors, it’s because I can’t see half my text). On most of your posts, I can’t see 1/3 to 1/4 of your text because it slides under the right column. Just thought I would post in case others are having similar problems

  4. Jill

    Oh no. I hate CSS messes.

  5. Lars

    You’re welcome, Jill. Wish I could be at the seminar, but budget does not allow long trips at the moment. I have some ideas brewing on e-lit, though.
    And yes, it really is annoying that the browser fails to wrap text when you want it to. As a quick fix, edit comment no. 1 above to show a link text rather than the entire URL. Then perform a similar trick with the long URLs in the “vote!” box.

  6. Lars

    …or you could try this:

  7. Jill

    Thanks for identifying the problem, Lars – old one, that, but I keep forgetting it because my browser handles long URLs fine.

    The comment box being under the right column sucks, I know, I tried to fix it ages ago but gave up and won’t be getting back to it any time soon. You can resize the window. That’s not cool, I know. Sorry.

    Lars, I’m looking forward to seeing any e-lit ideas you come up with 🙂

  8. William Wend

    I will link to it and blog it later this week!

  9. Jill

    Why thank you, William! And thanks, Steve and Scott, for your links too 🙂

  10. Descargar

    For example, this comments box slides under the “current research” sidebar (so if there are any spelling errors, it’s because I can’t see

  11. Jill

    Yeah. I know. It sucks. Sorry.

  12. Descargar

    The comment box being under the right column sucks, I know, I tried to fix it ages ago but gave up and won’t be getting back to it any time soon. You can resize the window. That’s not cool, I know. Sorry

  13. Messenger

    HOLA

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