Eirik Newth’s latest column over at Kulturnett uses jill/txt as an example to explain the social aspects of blogging – comments, trackbacks and so on. He writes:

[B]logger som jill/txt fungerer mer som knutepunkter i et nettverk av medskapende lesere enn som enkeltstÂende vevsider. (Blogs like jill/txt function more as nodes in a network of co-creating readers than as singular webpages.

In this morning’s New Media Theory lecture I amazed myself by happily talking for 45 minutes about the (at least) three prehistories of new media (that of the artists, the literary one and the cinematic one) and the difference between emphasising the work and the network. And I explained how using a course blog not only is a useful learning tool but helps us understand the network: it’s serial, social and about process.

I gave my first paid lecture two years ago or so, and Eirik Newth was the first presenter of the day. I watched in awe, nervously clutching my anxiously powerpoint-filled laptop, as he talked about e-books for two hours without notes or projectors. I’m so surprised that now I find yabbing on about something I’m interested in so much easier than setting up useful problems for the students to actually work on themselves. I had expected it to be the other way around.

2 thoughts on “serial, social, process

  1. Robert

    Eek! You forgot to close a tag somewhere…

  2. Eiriks forfatterblogg

    Sammen skal vi leve
    er tittelen p mitt nyeste bidrag til Magasinet til Kulturnett. Temaet er det nye motebegrepet “social software”, som jeg (oppfinnsomt

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