Are you supposed to feed a cold and starve a fever or is it the other way round? My head aches and my throat is sore and there is all this work that needs me to do it. A funding application to rewrite, people to email, payments to arrange, a website to get started, guest lectures to prepare, a paper to write, a review to write, student papers to read and respond to. And here I was thinking that oh, once the conference is over, there’ll be time. Of course there isn’t. There never is. I need to make more time for research, that much is clear – just finishing a big administrative task doesn’t automatically make time for research appear. There are always more things that want me to do them. I’m strict and tell them not now! Wait your turn! Find somebody else to nag! But then I give in to the guilt anyway.

Now I’m going to rug up and walk for a half hour on slippery frosty roads to the university where I’ll listen to students presenting their projects and hopefully, I’ll have wonderful constructive things to say in response that will send them off enthused and motivated to write more and improve and explore and think.

Maybe fresh, crisp air is good for colds?

5 thoughts on “making time

  1. steve

    I’m still trying to work out the math by which being sick for one week was able to put me three weeks behind. There doesn’t seem to be a rational explanation for that being possible, and yet…

    I think my students enjoyed it when my cocktail of medications led me astray on loopy tangents while I was lecturing. So at least they got something out of it.

  2. Niels

    Well, good luck then.

    Luckily germs can not be spread via the Net.

    Niels

  3. Lois

    Starve a cold…feed a fever. Feed a fever to help your body kill the infection.

  4. torill

    Sometimes I want to be sick just so I can ignore all those things that need to be done. Seems like the bugs know that, and stay away out of pure viciousness until I have time to do fun stuff.

  5. Jill

    Exactly… And anyway, I’m not sick enough to ignore that impatiently jostling line of things wanting to be done. Just sick enough to kind of confuse things and get sooo sleepy and cough on my screen. Ah well.

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