Norwegians with Windows98se or newer, certain other software, a broadband net connection and a library card at Deichmanske bibliotek in Oslo or at Bergen Public Library can now “borrow” music from Phonofile’s collection of music with Norwegian copyright holders. The music is streamed to you when you “borrow” it, and only one person can listen to any song at any one time. LÂtlÂn is a trial project that will last for six months. Pity it’s not open platform. (via Eirik)

3 thoughts on “lÂtlÂn

  1. Jan Tore

    I didn’t quite get the part about “one person at a time” – I figured it was some kind of strange license rule prohibiting more than one listener in front of the computer while streaming – but when I read it in Norwegian, i got the point:

    They lend you one song, and nobody else (in the world) can listen to it at the same time. Just as if you had borrowed the one copy of a book at the library.

    Crazy concept.

  2. Eirik

    Yep, duplicating the functionality of the analogue library is obviously the point here. Too bad they were unable to test an open, full-featured digital lending system, but it couldn’t have been done any other way as long as the musician’s rights management organization (TONO) is involved.

  3. Blogg og bibliotek

    LÂtLÂn – eller MSLÂtlÂn
    Et fantastisk tilbud har dukket opp! LÂtlÂn er musikkbibliotekenes svar p e-boken. Her kan du h¯re p favorittmusikken din s mye du vil OM… du har en Microsoft-godtatt datamaskin og nettleser. Uten Windows 98 eller nyere og Microsoft Internet Explo…

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