Twenty students have signed up for my web design and aesthetics course, and they’re rolling in steadily, a few a day. I wonder how many there’ll be in all? The deadline for registration isn’t till February 1. As a student I loved that I could shop around and go to a few lectures before committing to taking a course. As a teacher I hate it. I want to know how many students I’ll have! Now!

4 thoughts on “how many students?

  1. Mitsu

    Well, a nerdly approach would be: you could ask other professors what their typical signup curve is for the spring term, and create a model that would let you estimate the number of total students you will have based on past experience.

    For the future, you could keep a record of how many students signed up and when, which you can use as a curve to predict later…

  2. Jill

    Ah! Cunning! This is the first year we have this particular sign up system, so I can’t compare data just yet – but I can take note for next year.

    So for future reference: There are now 23 registered students. Orientation meetings are tomorrow, the student loans Monday and the first lecture Monday.

  3. Elin

    But Jill!
    This is what students of humanistic informatics have to learn to do .. or at least we did, when I was there.
    Not that we enjoyed it much, most of us.. but perhaps you can have the students do it FOR you… eksamens oppgave..?
    E.

  4. HÂkon Styri

    “a nerdly approach would be: you could ask other professors”

    Only problem with that approach would be that lectures apparently start before the sign-up deadline. Students may test drive the available lecturers before deciding.

    Scary?

    (Nah, not really. Being assigned a lecture room mondays at 8 am is hat I ould call somehat scary. Hopefully that doesn’t apply to you.)

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