The ELMCIP project group here in Bergen has been spending a lot of time feeding the Knowledge base of electronic literature over the last few months, and it’s really starting to come together. Look, here’s a screencast I made showing how all the entries are connected together:

That was made a couple of weeks ago, and the colour scheme has changed since then. But the Knowledge Base is in public beta now, so you can go poke around for yourself to see how you like it.

One of the most wonderful (though slightly overwhelming) things I’ve found from feeding the database is just how much has been done in electronic literature now. I’m used to thinking of this as a small field, but it really isn’t any more. There are certainly still hubs – go and have a look at the record for Shelley Jackson’s Patchwork Girl, for instance, to see how many people have written about it and are teaching it. (And remember that the database is NOT complete by any means!) And yet when I start adding a syllabus I find, for instance, I find myself adding new works I’ve never seen by authors I’ve not previously come across (who also have to be added) who have other interesting publications (that I also want to add).

Next week, most of the rest of the ELMCIP crew is off to Jyv‰skyl‰ for a seminar on publishing in electronic literature hosted by Raine Koskimaa and colleagues. I was supposed to go but decided to stay with my babies instead – when they grow just a little bit more I’ll be keen on conferences again, but for now, I’m happy with all the people who come through Bergen and all the things that can be done online.

2 thoughts on “feeding e-lit to the ELMCIP knowledge base

  1. William Patrick Wend

    Scott invited me to participate in this. I haven’t had much time yet, but once the semester ends I am going to spend a little time each day adding to it.

  2. Shkurte

    I love Patchwork Girl and I understand why a lot of authors have written about it. It is a work which I think will always have a special place in the digital fiction field.

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