Ian Bogost notes that there are fewer political games so far in this US presidential campaign than there were in 2004. Largely, he argues, and this seems fair, because “since 2004, online video and social networks have become the big thing, as blogs were four years ago”. I wonder how this may shift as time passes?

1 Comment

  1. Gene

    I noticed this as well, I loved playing those silly little games that took the mick out of the candidates.

    Its also scary to think how the internet has changed over the years and where it will go next.

    Bring back the games 🙂

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