Wearable devices for tracking baby

The Sprouting ankle band promises to monitor your baby's sleep and heart rate and to warn parents when baby is about to wake up.

The Sprouting ankle band promises to monitor your baby’s sleep and heart rate and to warn parents when baby is about to wake up.

Benji is only four years old, but the wearable baby trackers I discovered this evening make his infancy look like the stone age in comparison. Sure, I used TrixieTracker to track Jessie’s napping six years ago, but I had to enter all that data myself. Now, you simply dress your baby in a custom-made onesie or snap a band around her ankle and you can let your smart phone alert you if her breathing, body temperature or heart rate are not OK. The Sproutling ankle band, which isn’t actually available yet but plans to go to market later this year, will even let you know when your baby is going to wake up from her nap. To the minute, they hope.

When your baby wears the Mimo Kimono with the little Turtle snapped into place, you can monitor her breathing and body motions on your smartphone app.

When your baby wears the Mimo Kimono with the little Turtle snapped into place, you can monitor her breathing and body motions on your smartphone app.

And what about a Withings baby scale? Weigh your baby every day, every hour if you want, and hey, you can sync it with your Babynes capsule based baby formula machine (like Nespresso but for baby formula and even more expensive) which will graph how much milk your baby drinks. Or at least how much milk your Babynes makes. And you can edit it.

I remember when my eldest baby was about eight weeks I realized one of the other mums was going to the well baby centre a couple of times a week to weigh her baby, not just according to the set schedule – 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 12 weeks or whatever it was. I started going more often too, thinking that was what a good mother was supposed to do, until the nurse asked me why. There’s really no point in weighing a baby that often, she told me, unless you have a particular reason to be concerned. Weight fluctuates from day to day. Frequent weighing is more likely to make you nervous than not, which probably isn’t that great for your baby. I relaxed, and stopped worrying about it.

I’m honestly rather glad I don’t have babies anymore. I know I would be torn between desiring all those gadgets, all that data and thinking the whole thing was insane.

And look, the apps generate endless data, data like diaries. With predictive abilities. Maybe.

The Withings baby scale lets you know exactly what your baby weighs as often as you like, and compares it to standard growth charts. You can even send your pediatrician a copy. Which may possibly be useful for preemies or in very rare other cases, I suppose.

The Withings baby scale lets you know exactly what your baby weighs as often as you like, and compares it to standard growth charts. You can even send your pediatrician a copy. Which may possibly be useful for preemies or in very rare other cases, I suppose.

Of course breastmilk is better for your child, Nestlé admits at the end of each ad, but look how objectively you can track your baby's food if you use a bottle instead!

Of course breastmilk is better for your child, Nestlé admits at the end of each ad, but look how objectively you can track your baby’s food if you use a bottle instead!

The app that goes with the Mimo Baby Monitor - wearable devices for a baby.

The app that goes with the Mimo Baby Monitor shows you lots of data.

 

22. May 2014 by Jill
Categories: Visualise me | 3 comments

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