Category Archives for Networked Politics

We need to teach our kids to code!

I wrote an op-ed for Aftenposten today about the need to teach our kids programming. Working on the government report on hindrances for digital innovation in Norway I read a lot about how we currently define “digital competency” and “digital … Continue reading

25. March 2013 by Jill
Categories: Networked Politics, social media | Leave a comment

How to be an open access scholar

After writing a blog post about open access, Bente Kalsnes asked today for practical suggestions on how to be an Open Access researcher. Here’s how: Publish in open access journals. If you’re in Norway, you’ll also want to search DBH’s list … Continue reading

17. January 2013 by Jill
Categories: Networked Politics | 1 comment

#PDFtribute, Aaron Swartz, and the need to fight for open access in academic publishing

Three days ago, internet activist Aaron Swartz killed himself, as has been reported widely across social and traditional media. He killed himself on the second anniversary of being arrested for having downloaded thousands of academic articles from JSTOR via a … Continue reading

14. January 2013 by Jill
Categories: Networked Politics, Running for Vice-Rector | Tags: , , , | 1 comment

What are the main hindrances for innovation in Norwegian digital content and sercvices?

For just over a year, I’ve been going to Oslo once a month to discuss hindrances for innovation and growth in digital content and services in Norway with an incredibly inspiring group of people: lawyers, consumer rights’ advocates, programmers, a … Continue reading

10. January 2013 by Jill
Categories: Networked Politics | Leave a comment

Do we WANT to be able to predict an election result?

So what does it do to democracy if we can predict the results of an election with 100% accuracy? Nate Silver’s predictions at the NY Times’ Fivethirtyeight.com election poll blog correctly called the results of 50 out of 50 states in this … Continue reading

07. November 2012 by Jill
Categories: Networked Politics | Leave a comment

Wikipedia edits visualised by gender and location

The Association of Internet Researchers has an amazingly useful mailing list where scholars discuss topics and often compile wonderful lists of resources and papers on particular topics. The archives are online, and subscription is free. Currently there’s a discussion of … Continue reading

17. August 2012 by Jill
Categories: Networked Politics, social media | Tags: , | 1 comment

Sex, ekstremisme og mediesirkus

“[This is about a local extremist anti-feminist blogger who was recently jailed for threatening to murder police officers.  I’ve been invited to participate in a radio debate on the media coverage this afternoon, so in the following I try to … Continue reading

31. July 2012 by Jill
Categories: Blogging, Networked Politics | 11 comments

Orality is power; social media let us be controlled?

Computers make more and more aspects of work into data that can be collected and monitored, according to Shoshana Zuboff’s In the Age of the Smart Machine (1984), writes Rob Horning in The New Inquiry, and he takes her argument forwards into the age … Continue reading

12. June 2012 by Jill
Categories: Networked Politics, Visualise me | Leave a comment

“One Europe – One Market”

Yesterday I spent the day at a very different kind of conference to the ones I usually attend: an EU conference called “One Europe – One Market“where EU commissioners, industry representatives and princesses discussed the future of the common, single … Continue reading

03. February 2012 by Jill
Categories: Networked Politics | Leave a comment

Wikipedia and Craigslist (and thousands of other websites) blackout in protest of SOPA

Wikipedia is on strike today, to protest SOPA and other proposed legislation that would censor the Internet in order to attempt to prevent piracy. The ways in which lawmakers (frequently pushed by the movie and music industry) are attempting to … Continue reading

18. January 2012 by Jill
Categories: Networked Politics | 1 comment

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